Tag Archives: Mayor Daley

When Larry and Magic Owned The Game

This book by Larry Bird and Magic Johnson is must reading for hoops junkies of a certain vintage.

One of the first stories I did while at South Shore Community News involved covering the opening of the first Starbucks on Chicago’s South Side.

Ald. Leslie Hairston was there, brimming with excitement.  Mayor Daley was there, touting his insistence that the community get the same store design as those in the suburbs.

And Magic Johnson was there.

As always, he charmed the crowd, sending regards to Michael Jordan, backing off when he invoked Wal-Mart as a place moms want to go in a neighborhood, and shooting down a question from Craig Dellimore about whether the opening of Starbucks would lead to gentrification.  “I’ve got some statistics up in here,” he said, in essence.

After the press conference ended, I took one of the free mugs being distributed and joined the line to have it autographed for Aidan.

When I got there, I shook his hand, explained that I was from Boston and had grown up watching his battles with Larry Bird and our beloved Celtics.

“Those were the great ones,” he said.

“We didn’t always like you, but we always respected you,” I said.

“I know,” he replied.

As they note in the introduction to their book, When The Game Was Ours, Larry and Magic have been linked ever since their initial meeting in the 1979  NCAA championship game.   While they have been the subject of a number of books, most recently Seth Davis’ work about that game and the season that preceded it, they had not written and revealed so much about their impact on each other.

This book does that.

Written in conjunction with Jackie MacMullan, When The Game Was Ours is a must read for hoops junkies, especially those like me who came of age during Bird and Magic’s heyday and the NBA’s exponential growth.

The book opens with a description of a dazzling play they had while on a college all-star team in 1978.  Neither player got much time on the Joe B. Hall-dominated squad, and the play was not recorded, but it was one that both men remembered vividly and recounted to MacMullan.

When The Game Was Ours has a lot of familiar material as this territory has been mined before, and it also has some new and juicy tidbits that eager readers will be sure to devour (I don’t want to divulge them for fear of spoiling the pleasure of uncovering something new and different.).

One thing I will say is that the book does go in some detail into the 1985 Converse commercial, shot at Bird’s home in French Lick, that led to a softening in the hard feelings the two men had borne toward each other.  The section about Magic’s learning he had contracted HIV is powerful and poignant.

In the introduction, both men note that they are asked how the other is doing far more often than about former teammates.

After reading this book, we have a better understanding of why that is so, and how much these enormously talented, driven and dedicated men have meant to each other.

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Ron Huberman’s Reading List

CTA President Ron Huberman is slated to become schools chief today; here are some reading suggestions for him.

CTA President Ron Huberman is slated to become schools chief today; here are some reading suggestions for him.

In a surprising move, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley apparently is going to appoint Chicago Transit Authority President Ron Huberman to head the Chicago Public Schools today.

The 37-year-old Huberman, who has no education experience, will replace U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

Huberman clearly will not be lacking for things to do in the upcoming days, weeks and months. 

Still, in order to familiarize himself with the field in general, and with inner-city education in Chicago in particular, he might consider reading the following:

1. Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families, by J. Anthony Lukas.  Set in Boston, this absolutely classic work traces the lives of three families-one Yankee, one Irish-American, and one black-during the decade that starts in 1968 with Dr. King’s assassination.  In addition to reading like a novel and emphasizing the importance of class, Common Ground has extensive sections on children’s education, the intersection of internal and external social forces, and the factors that promote or hinder achievement.

2. So Much Reform, So Little Change: The Persistence of Failure in Urban Schools, by Charles Payne.  This recently released book by acclaimed historian Payne provides a ‘guardedly optimistic’ if sobering look at urban school reform during the past 30 years. 

Payne’s central contention is that school reform efforts often do not address the lived realities of students in the hardest to impact schools, and thus have little chance of truly helping those students reach their potential. Heavy in references to the work of the Consortium on Chicago School Research and Chicago Reporter sister publication Catalyst-Chicago, the book is stronger on diagnosing than solving the problem, but is a useful orientation to school reform efforts in Chicago as they relate to the national landscape. 

3.Maggie’s American Dream: The Life and Times of  A Black Family, by James Comer.  Yale psychiatrist Comer has developed a highly successful method of collective adult involvement in students’ lives to boost achievement and build community.  In this book, he tells the story of his mother Maggie, who helped inspire and form his vision.

4. The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America, by Jonathan Kozol.  This 2005 book returns to the subject of education, which Kozol first tackled 40 years ago in his National Book Award-winning Death at an Early Age: The Destruction of the Hearts and Minds of Negro Children in the Boston Public Schools, and offers a bleak assessment of the state of education nationally 50 years after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision.

5. Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing People’s Minds, by Howard Gardner.  The MacArthur Award-winning Gardner pioneered and developed the concept of multiple intelligences.  In this book he writes about how business leaders, politicians and advocates can go about changing public consensus. 

Gardner discusses seven levers to change and six realms in which they occur (Two are classrooms and diverse groups like a city or nation).   Although a bit vague on specifics, the book could be useful for Huberman to consider both in terms of his work within the schools and the public perception of him as having dubious qualifications for his job.