Saints’ Super Bowl Celebration, Michael Pollan’s food rules.

New Orleans Saints fans may not heed Michael Pollan's food rules, but others should think about it.

The Super Bowl’s over, and the Saints have won.

The underdog pulled off a dramatic come-from-behind victory, shrugging off a 10-point first quarter deficit and a failed fourth-down run by Pierre Thomas to take a fourth-quarter lead on a Drew Brees pass to Jeremy Shockey and then seal the victory with a 74-yard interception return for a touchdown by Tracy Porter.

After withstanding a final drive by four-time MVP Peyton Manning, the celebrations began.

They look to be epic.

In addition to celebrating the Saints’ first-ever championship, a triumph that sheds 43 years of frustration and heartache, New Orleans residents will roll right into Mardi Gras next Tuesday, February 16.

A quick prediction: don’t expect productivity in the Gulf region to be too high this month.

As Red Sox fans, we have had a similar experience during the magical run of October 2004, where the entire populace of New England slept little and worked less.

Cajun food is not always known for its nutritional value.  Revelers may also be tempted to buy the Doritos and Bud Light that their companies hawked relentlessly during the Super Bowl.

People looking to go in a healthier direction might be guided by the ideas articulated in Michael Pollan’s slender new book, Food Rules.

The author of two previous volumes, neither of which I have yet read, has compiled a collection of 64 rules about what and how to eat.

In a January interview, Pollan explains that the impetus for the book came from doctors who had read his earlier works and asked him to provide them with a short pamphlet to give to their patients in lieu of a lecture.

The tips are straightforward and practical.

Two of my favorites are number 19. ” If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t,” and number 39, which tells people to “eat all the junk food you want as long as you cook it yourself.”

These examples give a sample of Pollan’s direct writing style as well as his underlying philosophy.  At different points in the book, he encourages the readers to eat slowly and to have a glass of wine.

There is little new or earth shattering in Pollan’s latest work; his intention seems more to be an effort to get people off of Western diets and onto healthier ways of living.

It’s unclear whether any New Orleans celebrants will heed his advice.  But I do know that I’m having a veggie burger tonight.  I just hope it’s not too processed.

UPDATE: Lanne Long comments on Michael Pollan and her eating habits:

I am a Pollan follower. I got the kindle version for my iPod Touch of his books. I watch him on TV (Oprah) and at the movies Food, Inc. I listen to his lecture on my iTunesU college-cast when I jog. I know, weird as it is, I jog to Pollan, and other food Podcasts. Last I checked, I deleted any music to make more room for food Podcasts.

Ideally, it would be nice to do all that he suggests. I am really far ahead of the curve amongst my friends and family, but I have not met the idea. There is always an event that is more about friendship, than eating ideally. Like last night while enjoying an evening with friends, I so enjoyed the Super Bowl party food last night with industrial corn chips and dip, potato chips and dip (all with unnatural “natural flavors”), industrial feed lot beef, and industrial grown flour and milk product mac and cheese. All of this, fat and salt on fat and salt was quite appealing to my taste!

Today, detox. Organic soy milk and banana for breakfast, organic salad green and fruit for lunch. Dinner, I have been looking at local organic small farm raised goat in a tomato, red pepper sauce from veggies I put up in the freezer from my local oganic CSA, and locally made Kamut pasta. Kamut is an ancient grain (farmer uses heirloom seed) grown only in one place in the USA right now.

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4 responses to “Saints’ Super Bowl Celebration, Michael Pollan’s food rules.

  1. I am a Pollan follower. I got the kindle version for my iPod Touch of his books. I watch him on TV (Oprah) and at the movies Food, Inc. I listen to his lecture on my iTunesU college-cast when I jog. I know, weird as it is, I jog to Pollan, and other food Podcasts. Last I checked, I deleted any music to make more room for food Podcasts.

    Ideally, it would be nice to do all that he suggests. I am really far ahead of the curve amongst my friends and family, but I have not met the idea. There is always an event that is more about friendship, than eating ideally. Like last night while enjoying an evening with friends, I so enjoyed the Super Bowl party food last night with industrial corn chips and dip, potato chips and dip (all with unnatural “natural flavors”), industrial feed lot beef, and industrial grown flour and milk product mac and cheese. All of this, fat and salt on fat and salt was quite appealing to my taste!

    Today, detox. Organic soy milk and banana for breakfast, organic salad green and fruit for lunch. Dinner, I have been looking at local organic small farm raised goat in a tomato, red pepper sauce from veggies I put up in the freezer from my local oganic CSA, and locally made Kamut pasta. Kamut is an ancient grain (farmer uses heirloom seed) grown only in one place in the USA right now.

  2. http://lannaelong.blogspot.com/2010_02_01_archive.html

    LOL! I eat so polar-esque. See my 2 most recent Feb 2010 posts. 1 is about my CSA, and the 2nd is about my chain food nightmare gut and body ache.

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