Nancy Pelosi’s moment and memoir.

Nancy Pelosi's memoir gives insight into the roots of the Speaker's recent victory.

Although health care reform may have nowhere to go in the Senate, it cleared a major hurdle yesterday as a compromise bill squeaked by in the House, 220-215.

While some pundits have called the legislation a major victory for President Barack Obama, others are giving far more credit to Nancy Pelosi, the nation’s first female Speaker of the House.

Pelosi’s tenacity, unceasing effort, and blend of persuasion and coercion contributed mightily to the bill’s narrow passage.

If some version of the bill passes in the Senate and is ultimately signed into law by Obama, it may be Pelosi’s signature moment in public service.

Pelosi tells the story of her life and political career in Know Your Power: A Message to America’s Daughters.

Pelosi’s exposure to politics began early.

Her father was Thomas D’Alesandro, was both a Congressman and later Mayor of Baltimore.  Her childhood home included expectations that one could achieve what one wanted provided that one was willing to put in the necessary work.

Whatever her detractors say, and there are many of them, they have to concede her willingness to do the gritty work necessary to get elected and to govern.

Pelosi shares how she did not originally set out to become the nation’s third most powerful elected official, but that she applied the tools she learned in her youth and, as a mother, working to effect change locally through her local PTA.

Her arc and ultimate success is a quintessentially American story, and, as the title implies, one that Pelosi wants young women to know about and absorb.  While waiting for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to decide whether he can marshall a filibuster-proof majority on the Senate side, you might want to read Pelosi’s brief and accessible memoir.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Nancy Pelosi’s moment and memoir.

  1. Dear Mr. Levingston,

    Iglu is my second novel focused on environmental and cultural destruction due to global warming. The dark political novel tells the story of April Ipalook, a fourteen-year-old Inupiaq Eskimo girl traveling across the war-torn Arctic. I am writing to see if you would be interested in reviewing the book. Here is a brief description:

    The rising sea has swallowed up most of the Iñupiaq people’s native land and millions of Americans from the lower forty-eight are being relocated to Alaska due to the devastation from global warming. But when the Iñupiaq people rise up to fight for the survival of their culture, the private army Skyhawk is brought in to subdue the growing insurgency and the Iñupiaq rebels are labeled as terrorists. Separated from her family in the aftermath of the ensuing battle, fourteen-year-old April Ipalook desperately searches for a place of refuge amidst the war zone of northern Alaska.

    The details of the U.S. government’s war with the Eskimo Army and the tension between the U.S., Canada and Russia emerge through transcripts of cabinet meetings, news shows, press conferences and other news media that appear at the end of each chapter. For more information please see my website: jacobsackin.com. Let me know if you are interested in reviewing the book and I will send you a copy.

    Thank you for your time,

    Jacob Sackin

  2. I am writing to see if you would be interested in writing a review of my second novel focused on environmental and cultural destruction due to global warming, entitled Iglu. The political novel tells the story of April Ipalook, a fourteen-year-old Inupiaq Eskimo girl traveling across the war-torn Arctic. Here is a brief description:

    The rising sea has swallowed up most of the Iñupiaq people’s native land and millions of Americans from the lower forty-eight are being relocated to Alaska due to the devastation from global warming. But when the Iñupiaq people rise up to fight for the survival of their culture, the private army Skyhawk is brought in to subdue the growing insurgency and the Iñupiaq rebels are labeled as terrorists. Separated from her family in the aftermath of the ensuing battle, fourteen-year-old April Ipalook desperately searches for a place of refuge amidst the war zone of northern Alaska.

    The details of the U.S. government’s war with the Eskimo Army and the tension between the U.S., Canada and Russia emerge through transcripts of cabinet meetings, news shows, press conferences and other news media that appear at the end of each chapter. For more information please see my website: jacobsackin.com. Let me know if you are interested in reviewing the book and I will send you a copy.

    Thank you for your time,

    Jacob Sackin

    • jeffkellylowenstein3

      Dear Jacob,

      I am interested in reading and writing about your book.

      Please feel free to send me a copy at the following address:

      Jeff Kelly Lowenstein
      435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1200
      Chicago, IL 60611

      I look forward to reading your work.

      Jeff

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s